New York Times bestsellers Chris Crowley coauthor of Thinner This Year comes on the show to talk about the formula of a good healthy life with Jason Hartman.

Key Takeaways

01:35   Revolution in behavior and aging, and the third act of life.

02:42   A good life needs serious exercise to really change and eliminate inflammation.

04:37   Sarcopenia reduced muscle mass and bone density but can thankfully be offset by strength training.

06:46   Dr. Henry Lodge and Prof. Jen Sacheck both powerfully insist that supplements are not a good source for nutrients.

07:55 – The body needs a broad spectrum of nutrients and staying away from prepared foods.

09:32 – No scientific study has been done on paleo or gluten-free that showed they’re not just another fad that go through anti-grain beliefs, despite the whole grain benefits.

12:19 – thinnerthisyear.com and youngernextyear.com for information and books.

Mentioned in this episode

Younger Next Year  by Chris Crowley and Dr. Henry Lodge

Younger Next Year for Women  by Chris Crowley and Dr. Harry Lodge

Thinner This Year by Chris Crowley and Prof. Jennifer Sacheck

www.tufts.edu/

Tweetables

The only way to get good vitamins and nutrients, is to eat decent food all the time.

Don’t bother with supplements, they’re shockingly expensive and all they can give you is expensive urine.

You only have one body you better take good care of it, no shortcuts.

Intro:

Welcome to The Longevity Show. Informing listeners on important aspects on health, wealth and happiness to insure you live life to its fullest with fascinating interviews with top authors and gurus of the field. Along with the latest news in the science and technology of longevity. We’re going to reveal expert advice and amazing secrets of living a longer, happier life. And now here’s your host Jason Hartman.

Jason Hartman:

It’s my pleasure to welcome Chris Crowley to the show. He’s the coauthor of New York Times bestsellers Younger Next Year, Younger Next Year for Women and Thinner This Year a diet in exercise program for living strong, fit, and sexy. Chris welcome, how are you?

Chris Crowley:

Glad to be here, how are you?

Jason:

Well good, it’s good to have you on the show and I always like to give my listeners a little sense of geography. Where are you located today?

Chris:

I’m in New York city a lot of the time, but right now we have a house up in the Berkshire and I’m in big Victorian house in the middle fields of show and freezing cold.

Jason:

Yeah, we could really use some of that global warming we keep getting promised, right about now! [Laughs]

Chris:

And a lot would be I tell you.

Jason:

That’s for sure.

Chris:

It was well below zero here all weekend long, it was interesting.

Jason:

So Thinner This Year is the latest book is that correct?

Chris:

Yes it is.

Jason:

Okay good, let’s just drive into your philosophy on health and longevity, take it where you want to take it and I’ll ask questions as we go.

Chris:

You bet, let me tell it like this, basically the original books Younger Next Year which were a huge success and still selling like hotcakes years later. The basic premise is that there is a revolution in aging, and revolution in behavior and if you do some stuff in behavioral changes you can  avoid seventy percent of normal American aging until the very end of life which is extraordinary and you can avoid, not avoid, but avoid completely fifty percent of all the serious illness and accidents that the other kids have, all yeah! Not just [inaudible] just plain don’t have heart attacks, strokes, adult onset diabetes, Alzheimer, cancers, the worst, and these books have been out for a while and no one disagrees with those notions. Behavioral change makes a fantastic difference in the quality of life especially in the third act.

Jason:

And what is the third act? how do you define them?

Chris:

Oh, after your fifty-five or sixty whatever it is, the last third of your life. Whatever it is.

Jason:

Okay good.

Chris:

I will not peak on the third act.

Jason:

Sure, absolutely, well okay good, and do you offer advice on do behavioral changes? at all?

Chris: 

Well yes, we do [Laughs] it turns out that the formula of a good life in our view, is serious exercises, six days a week until the day you die. That’s sounds gaga unless you think all the time about the numbers that I’ve just mention. that’s seventy percent of aging, that’s fifty percent of serious illness and accidents. Serious exercises does astonishing things, it changes your body chemistry in fundamental ways. It eliminates inflammation, that’s the mother and father of serious illness. It just plain does, it does extraordinary stuff, amazing charges, it’s makes a world of sense to do. Four days of serious aerobic exercises every week and do two days of strength training which I still hate! But it does different stuff, you’d want to do both of those things, and finally and separately it makes, especially in this country it makes great sense to quit eating the way we eat and follow different eating patterns. We can talk about that separately.

Jason:

Yeah, no question, we can talk about the eating problems of American for days on end. But on the exercises thing you maintain cardio and strength or weight training, where does yoga come into play, if at all?

Chris:

Yoga is terrific, you want to look at it, be careful there are things you can pull at yoga. A lot of people  go line up at physical therapist because yoga stuff, but it’s wonderful if you do it right, it’s terrific and if you have the right people. It’s probably closer to strength training than anything else, but there is awful lot of different kinds of yoga some of the very much like aerobic exercise, not many but mostly sort of like strength training.

Jason:

Yeah okay.

Chris:

And they are some strength training done in a certain way.

Jason:

Absolutely, that’s good advise so far. Let’s drill down a little bit more and maybe I’ll ask you on the exercises front, what are some of the repercussion of not exercising, especially after age thirty?

Chris:

Let me take the obvious one, do you know what sarcopenia is?

Jason:

I’ve heard of it.

Chris:

[Laughs] Congratulation! Nobody even heard that word and we all have it.

Jason:

I’ve heard the word.

Chris:

Sarcopenia is deposition to lose five to ten percent of your muscle mass every decade after thirty. It’s just-

Jason:

Right.

Chris:

-horrendous! We’re losing vast amounts of muscle mass as we age and there is no need for it. Do some strength training, you can offset muscle mass almost completely in the same vein, we’re all suffering from bone loss, we have terrible bone loss; especially in women after menopause, two percent a year the bones are going out the window. Just dreadful, you can offset that too by strength training. It is so important it’s just night and day in terms of quality in life. If you get to be as old as I am, I’m eighty a year to no fault of my own, but if you happen to get to be that old, let me tell ya. You can see your pals who don’t do this stuff, and they are limping along and they are not having fun, they are delicate. But do this stuff and you can be about the same man or woman you were in fifty until you are eighty and beyond. I know cause I’m there.

Jason:

Absolutely, so two percent of our bone density is lost every year?

Chris:

Women after menopause lose up to two percent of their bone mass a year. It’s just horrendous! And that’s where the broken hips and so on come from. And think about it, women in her late sixty falls down and break her hip very common thing to have happened. Half those people will never walk unaided again. It’s the cane, the walker and the chair. And twenty percent of those women will be dead in a year because of bone loss. Think about that.

Jason:

Wow, that’s unbelievable, that is just terrible. I know it’s not as, men get a little bit of pass on this, but men have the problem too, right?

Chris:

Oh absolutely, yep.

Jason:

It’s two percent for women up to two percent and that’s terrible. How does it work for the men though?

Chris:

Up to two percent after menopause, less than that before. And men are half percent to a percent, but men have too, it’s serious business. You know you live a lot of years, you’re losing about half of a percent of a percent a year, you lose a lot.

Jason:

Any supplementation for the bone thing? Or is it purely about strength training?

Chris:

I’m not the expert, I’m the coauthor of these books, I hang out with smart people. People like Henry Lodge my coauthor in the first books, and the wonderful Prof. Jen Sacheck from Tufts, they’re the brains of the outfit. They’re young and smart, and I’m old and funny that’s how we divided up. But-

Jason:

[Laughs]

Chris:

-they insist powerfully that supplement don’t make any sense. Supplement don’t do it, the way to get good vitamins and nutrients, is you eat decent food all the time. Don’t bother with the supplement, they’re shockingly expensive and all they give you is expensive urine.

Jason:

So we really aren’t absorbing things than you’re with the theory that all the vitamins go down in the toilet huh?

Chris:

Absolutely, it does- and even the wonderful one-a-day [inaudible] vitamin can’t hurt that’s probably true, probably can’t hurt but it can’t help either, too bad. I mean take all that dough save it up, buy yourself a great bicycle.

Jason:

Yeah okay. What else can people do? How about the carnivore, omnivore, herbivore debate? Should we be vegan?

Chris:

[Laughs] No, if you have a serious heart problem maybe it’s makes sense to go on a plant based diet. If I were having stents put in my body, I would start thinking hard about doing an all plant based diet. But up until that time I am told by Jen, a professor of nutrition and Tufts which is probably the best nutrition school in the country. And she and others who studied the actually science in nutrition, not many of the writers, sort of, do study that, they’re doctors and doctors don’t know much about nutrition. But the ones who studied, say that the answer is a broad base diet, heavy on fruit and vege, light on read meats, but some meats, some fish a little bit of lower on fats. But the notion that we’re going go paleo is deeply mistake when in our view, the same with atkins diet, there’s an obviously collocation between heavy eating and heavy fat and serious heart problems. It doesn’t make sense to do that, our notion is you eat less of that, but have a balance diet of all the good stuff. One of these quick to not eat is the stuff in the middle of a supermarket, all those prepared foods are jam-packed with sugar and added sugar, and added solid fats getting those out of your diet is a great ideal. But other wise heavy on fruit and vege, some good proteins, some fat, and not much in the way prepared foods are fashioned. That’s our suggestion.

Jason:

In just the paleo diet, of course takes out the breads and the grains. What do you think of them? It sounds like you’re not hugely fond of the paleo plan.

Chris:

There’s no scientific based at all for those things, it’s same as the gluten-free stuff. It’s a wonderful fad these days, they’re these tides that go through, like religious beliefs, tides that go through anti-this anti-that, no fat, all fat, all bread, all meat, blah blah blah. This anti-grain thing is particularly annoying. It make sense not to eat grains that’s a good ideal, white bread or white pasta or white rice skip it, good ideal, good for you, but whole grains are terrific for ya, my beloved brown rice, farros, whole wheat marvelous. The ideal of stopping those things just nuts doesn’t make sense.

Jason:

And why are they good for you? Is it the fiber?

Chris:

Yeah, they’re wonderful for fiber, which is important in having your body work properly and then full of vitamins, and minerals with all the nutrients that you need a lot, it’s crazy to give up. If you have phylaxis disease that’s a special situation you can’t have wheat, that makes plenty of sense, but that’s one percent of the population, too have all these gluten-free things on the market please, and there almost always substituting with other stuff that is not as good for you. Don’t worry about whole wheat, whole grains your good for. Unless you’ve got phylaxis, but that one percent of the population, and you’ll know you got that.

Jason:

Okay so high quality cereals mostly granola, all kind of that kind of stuff is great, huh?

Chris:

Try farros, farros are wonderful grain, I’m not nutty eater, I eat a lot of stuff, but farro is higher grain, it’s sort like a brown rice-

Jason:

Farros?

Chris:

Farros, it’s Italian grain, brown rice on steroids. Just terrific, really good stuff.

Jason:

Yeah okay fantastic, well what else should we know about diet, exercise, medicine, anything you want to talk about?

Chris:

[Laughs] Golly neds where the cures of the world, but our notion is that makes the big one, if I get to wrap it up I would say if I live a really good life, is serious exercises six days a week, four days aerobic, two day of strength training. That’s the single most thing important, if you can’t do that at least do the aerobic stuff that’s huge and don’t do it five minutes and so on, do it for a hard few, not hard for you, you know you don’t have to turn into Olympic athlete to do all this stuff, just vigorous for you, get your heart rate up. Quit eating prepared foods, don’t eat white rice, don’t eat white wheat, don’t eat most of the breads and stuff. I love breads, I love french fries, all that fried stuff, it’s not-

Jason:

Yeah it’s terrible, it’s so bad [Laughs]

Chris:

Yeah, the point is don’t go there and don’t go there and pretend you going to eat salad, you’re lying to yourself.

Jason:

Yeah that’s a very good point, very good point, well where can people find out about you and your books?

Chris:

Oh any place, we have a website thinnerthisyear.com and youngernextyear.com either one, and the books are online, and at any store, you can get them everywhere.

Jason:

And Chris is your advice applicable to all ages? Is it all across the board? Or is there certain ages different things.

Chris:

We kind of focus on the first books on the baby boomers just cause I was so darn old, but it really was marketing. This stuff applies to everybody, it makes a world of sense to start this when your twenty and sure that you can keep it up forever. It’s irritating now that I’m so darn old as I say, I notice what a difference it makes in my age, they were tweeting me at eighty and the people who were my age. I look at and think “Holy macro I was close” cause most of them are delicate man! and not having fun and I went skiing yesterday from the first time this year and thought “No, not so many of us eighty has rotted” and these is no reason not to be, it’s just foolishness.

Jason:

I know, you’re given one body you better take good care of it, no question about it.

Chris:

And it will do amazing things almost to all the way out, if you use it hard.

Jason:

That’s for sure.

Chris:

And if you don’t you are going straight to hell, and you will be in trouble.

Jason:

Yeah no question about it. Well Chris Crowley thank you so much for joining us to today.

Chris:

You bet that was fun!

Outro:

This show is produced by the Hartman Media Company, all rights reserved. For distribution or publication rights and media interviews, please visit www.hartmanmedia.com or email [email protected] Nothing on this show should be considered specific personal or professional advice. Please consult an appropriate tax, legal, real estate or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own and the host is acting on behalf of Platinum Properties Investor Network Inc. exclusively.

Because you listened to this post you might also try...

Related Posts